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Dilettante

1898 — 1899

Published anonymously in Spokane, Washington, The Dilettante is a good example of an “ephemeral bibelot,” a breed of short-lived, amateur literary magazines that flourished in America during the last decade of the 19th century.

Dome

1897 — 1898

Founded and edited by Ernest J. Oldmeadow, the first series of this magazine ran quarterly for five issues from March 1897 to May 1898. Each issue had sections on architecture, literature, drawing-painting-engraving, and music, with excellent illustrations of visual materials.

Egoist

1914 — 1919

The Egoist was a direct continuation of The New Freewoman (itself a continuation of The Freewoman) and continued the policies of its predecessor, with Dora Marsden ultimately shifting to “Contributing Editor” and Harriet Weaver becoming editor. It made a large contribution to modernist literature while continuing to discuss social and philosophical questions and issues.

English Review

1908 — 1910

Founded by Ford Madox Hueffer in 1908 and edited by him for fifteen issues, this influential magazine published works by established authors and new ones like D. H. Lawrence, Wyndham Lewis, and Ezra Pound.

Everybody’s Magazine

1911

Everybody’s Magazine ran from 1899-1929, in New York City, publishing journalism and fiction by authors such as Jack London and A.A. Milne. It later became a pulp magazine. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Forum

1910

The Forum was a highly respected magazine based in New York City, running from 1885-1950 and publishing authors such as G.K. Chesterton. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Freewoman

1911 — 1912

The Freewoman was established by Dora Marsden as “A Weekly Feminist Review” that would move beyond the vote to address such controversial issues as the economics and morality of sex. It was succeeded by two other magazines spearheaded by Marsden, The New Freewoman and The Egoist

Glebe

1914

The four Imagist anthologies, published annually between 1914 and 1917, promoted Imagism as an avant-garde movement and helped turn it into an important force in modern poetry. The Imagist Anthology Collection includes Des Imagistes (1914), ed. Ezra Pound, incl. in The Glebe and subsequent books; Some Imagist Poets (1915), ed. H. D. and Richard Aldington; The 1916 and 1917 successors, ed. Amy Lowell; Catholic Anthology (1915), ed. Ezra Pound in an answer to the first Some Imagist Poets anthology; and the May 1921 issue of Chapbook, with a section parodying Imagist anthologies, called “Pathology des Dommagistes.”

Good Housekeeping

1910

Good Housekeeping began in Holyoke, Massachusetts in 1885, later moving to New York City and publishing major literary figures such as Somerset Maugham, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Evelyn Waugh, and Virginia Woolf. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Harper’s Magazine

1911

Harper’s Magazine began in New York City in 1850, publishing English novelists and social commentary from world leaders. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Harper’s Weekly

1910

Harper’s Weekly was a political magazine in New York City from 1857-1916. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Ladies’ Home Journal

1911

Ladies’ Home Journal was founded in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1883 and later moved to Philadelphia, publishing a variety of material from muckraking journalism to fine arts, including the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Lady’s Realm

1911

Ladies’ Realm was a magazine for the “New Woman” published in London from 1896 to 1914 or 1915. It featured literature and social commentary from major writers of the period. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Little Review

1914 — 1922

Its modest title notwithstanding, The Little Review probably did more to promote modernism than any other American journal, representing in its pages dozens of international art movements and the leading avant-garde figures of the day. It’s also where most of Joyce’s Ulysses first appeared in print.

Mask

1911

The Mask was published in Florence, Italy, between 1908-1929, with a pause from 1915-1918 because of the First World War. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Citation

If you would like to cite the MJP, we recommend that you use the following notation:

The Modernist Journals Project (searchable database). Brown and Tulsa Universities, ongoing. www.modjourn.org

Copyright

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