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Smart Set

1910 — 1922

Jointly edited by H. L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan, The Smart Set in its heyday was a vehicle for popular modernism, bringing high-quality literature and cultural satire to a broad American audience.

Some Imagist Poets

1915

The four Imagist anthologies, published annually between 1914 and 1917, promoted Imagism as an avant-garde movement and helped turn it into an important force in modern poetry. The Imagist Anthology Collection includes Des Imagistes (1914), ed. Ezra Pound, incl. in The Glebe and subsequent books; Some Imagist Poets (1915), ed. H. D. and Richard Aldington; The 1916 and 1917 successors, ed. Amy Lowell; Catholic Anthology (1915), ed. Ezra Pound in an answer to the first Some Imagist Poets anthology; and the May 1921 issue of Chapbook, with a section parodying Imagist anthologies, called “Pathology des Dommagistes.”

Some Imagist Poets, 1916

1916

The four Imagist anthologies, published annually between 1914 and 1917, promoted Imagism as an avant-garde movement and helped turn it into an important force in modern poetry. The Imagist Anthology Collection includes Des Imagistes (1914), ed. Ezra Pound, incl. in The Glebe and subsequent books; Some Imagist Poets (1915), ed. H. D. and Richard Aldington; The 1916 and 1917 successors, ed. Amy Lowell; Catholic Anthology (1915), ed. Ezra Pound in an answer to the first Some Imagist Poets anthology; and the May 1921 issue of Chapbook, with a section parodying Imagist anthologies, called “Pathology des Dommagistes.”

Some Imagist Poets, 1917

1917

The four Imagist anthologies, published annually between 1914 and 1917, promoted Imagism as an avant-garde movement and helped turn it into an important force in modern poetry. The Imagist Anthology Collection includes Des Imagistes (1914), ed. Ezra Pound, incl. in The Glebe and subsequent books; Some Imagist Poets (1915), ed. H. D. and Richard Aldington; The 1916 and 1917 successors, ed. Amy Lowell; Catholic Anthology (1915), ed. Ezra Pound in an answer to the first Some Imagist Poets anthology; and the May 1921 issue of Chapbook, with a section parodying Imagist anthologies, called “Pathology des Dommagistes.”

Strand Magazine

1910

The Strand was a major organ for fiction in London from 1891 to 1950. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Tyro

1921 — 1922

Edited by Wyndham Lewis for two issues, this was a successor to Blast — still interesting but a bit tamer.

Weekly Tale-Teller

1911

Weekly Tale-Teller was a fiction magazine in London between 1909-1916. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Wheels

1916 — 1921

Published annually, with six issues appearing in the years from 1916 to 1921, this anthology of modernist poetry was dominated by the Sitwell siblings.

Wide World

1910

Wide World was a monthly illustrated fiction magazine that ran in London between 1898-1965. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Windsor Magazine

1911

Windsor Magazine was an illustrated monthly in London between 1895-1939. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Winter Owl

1923

The Owl, edited by Robert Graves sporadically, published a lot of good poetry by Georgian poets and younger writers. The third issue, of November 1923, appears as The Winter Owl.

World’s Work

1911

World’s Work was a pro-business New York monthly between 1900-1932. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Citation

If you would like to cite the MJP, we recommend that you use the following notation:

The Modernist Journals Project (searchable database). Brown and Tulsa Universities, ongoing. www.modjourn.org

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