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American Magazine

1910

The American Magazine offered illustrated fiction and journalism from 1906 until it closed in 1956. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Atlantic Monthly

1910

Since 1857, The Atlantic Monthly (now The Atlantic) has been a mainstay in literature and cultural journalism. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Blast

1914 — 1915

Blast is the quintessential modernist little magazine. Founded by Wyndham Lewis with the assistance of Ezra Pound, it was the organ for the Vorticist movement in London, running for just two issues in 1914 and 1915. The First World War killed it—along with some of its key contributors.

Blue Review

1913

Edited in London by John Middleton Murry and Katherine Mansfield, and running for just three issues, this was a successor to Rhythm.

Bookman

1910

The Bookman was published in New York City from 1895-1933, offering conservative commentary and fiction from prominent American authors. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Camera Work

1903 — 1917

Edited and published by Alfred Stieglitz, Camera Work championed photography as an art, showcasing the work of Photo-Secession photographers.

Catholic Anthology 1914-1915

1915

Ezra Pound edited the Catholic Anthology in 1915 as an answer to the first Some Imagist Poets anthology.

Century Magazine

1911

The Century was the successor to Scribner’s Monthly Magazine in New York City, publishing journalism, fiction, and poetry from 1881-1930. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Chapbook

1921

The May 1921 issue of Chapbook featured a section parodying Imagist anthologies, called “Pathology des Dommagistes.” The Imagist Anthology Collection also includes Des Imagistes (1914), ed. Ezra Pound, incl. versions in The Glebe and subsequent books; Some Imagist Poets (1915), ed. H. D. and Richard Aldington; The 1916 and 1917 successors, ed. by Amy Lowell; and Catholic Anthology (1915), ed. Ezra Pound in answer to the 1915 Some Imagist Poets .

Collier’s Magazine

1910

Collier’s underwent several name changes after beginning in 1888, offering investigative “muckraking” journalism, short fiction, and serialized novels until it closed in 1957. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Cosmopolitan

1911

Cosmopolitan began as a family magazine in 1886, in New York City, becoming a literary magazine in 1889. Its stature declined during the 1950s with the ascent of the paperback and television, until Helen Gurley Brown turned it into a magazine for the single career woman in 1965. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Coterie

1919 — 1920

Founded in 1919 by Oxford University law student Chaman Lall, this quarterly review emphasized avant-garde poetry until its conclusion with a double issue in 1921.

Crisis

1910 — 1922

Founded in 1910 as the house magazine of the NAACP and edited by W. E. B. Du Bois, The Crisis quickly became the most important voice of the African-American struggle for cultural identity and civic justice in the U.S.

Dana

1904 — 1905

Edited by “John Eglinton,” Dana was a forum for Irish cultural and literary debates in a time “when everything seemed possible.”

Des Imagistes

1914

The four Imagist anthologies, published annually between 1914 and 1917, promoted Imagism as an avant-garde movement and helped turn it into an important force in modern poetry. The Imagist Anthology Collection includes Des Imagistes (1914), ed. Ezra Pound, incl. in The Glebe and subsequent books; Some Imagist Poets (1915), ed. H. D. and Richard Aldington; The 1916 and 1917 successors, ed. Amy Lowell; Catholic Anthology (1915), ed. Ezra Pound in an answer to the first Some Imagist Poets anthology; and the May 1921 issue of Chapbook, with a section parodying Imagist anthologies, called “Pathology des Dommagistes.”

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The Modernist Journals Project (searchable database). Brown and Tulsa Universities, ongoing. www.modjourn.org

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