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Masses

1911 — 1917

With its distinctive mix of art and politics, The Masses remains one of the most important and influential American little magazines.

McClure’s Magazine

1900 — 1910

At the start of the 20th century, McClure’s pioneered “muckraking” journalism and became for a while the most influential magazine in America.

Mother Earth

1911

Mother Earth was a magazine of literature and social science founded by Emma Goldman in 1906. It ran until 1917, when the U.S. government used The Espionage Act during World War I to close the magazine and revoke Goldman’s citizenship, deporting her to the Soviet Union in 1919. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

New Age

1907 — 1928

Edited by A. R. Orage, this weekly review presented crucial debates over the kind of art, literature, and politics best suited for modernity.

New Freewoman

1913

The second of three magazines edited by Dora Marsden, this one emphasized egoism and was more literary than its predecessor. The first magazine she spearheaded was The Freewoman, while the third was The Egoist.

Others

1915 — 1919

Edited by Alfred Kreymborg, this short-lived little magazine played a major role in modernizing American poetry, with an emphasis on free verse.

Owl

1919

Edited by Robert Graves sporadically, this little magazine published a lot of good poetry by Georgian poets and younger writers. The third issue, of November 1923, appears as The Winter Owl.

Petit Journal des Refusées

1896

This is an example of the ephemeral bibelots catalogued by F. W. Faxon in 1903, offering hints of Dada and Surrealism before these modes of modernism actually developed. Each copy of the magazine is unique, so we’re providing three different versions of it.

Poetry

1912 — 1922

Founded and edited by Harriet Monroe in Chicago in 1912 and still running today, this magazine played a major role in creating an audience for modernist poetry.

Review of Reviews

1912

Review of Reviews ran in London from 1890-1936, with a very popular commentary on world affairs. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Rhythm

1911 — 1913

Edited by J. M. Murry, this little magazine stressed rhythm as the key to modernism and was especially strong in visual art. Rhythm was succeeded by The Blue Review

Saturday Evening Post

1911

Saturday Evening Post began in 1821 and was one of the most widely circulated magazines in the United States during the twentieth century. It is still published six times per year. This single issue is presented as part of the 1910 Collection, a group of 24 magazines published “on or about December 1910,” when, according to Virginia Woolf, “human character changed” and modernity became palpable.

Scribner’s Magazine

1910 — 1922

Published by Charles Scribner’s Sons, this magazine ran from 1887 to 1939, offering a wide range of authors and texts from the popular to the highbrow, as well as an abundance of illustrations, art reprints, photographs, and advertising.

Seven Arts

1916 — 1917

Though it lasted only a year, The Seven Arts had an oversized impact on American culture. Its mission was to promote an American renaissance, whereby the arts in the country would finally come of age by taking American life as their subject matter and the American people as their intended audience.

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